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These Go To Eleven

None More Black. We Are The Road Crew. Everything Louder Than Everything Else.

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A Rest Area Film

One of the very rare times Rest Area has had a camera inside the truck. Me with iPhone and hand-held theatre lamp; S.J bringing the ruckus.

Post-Rest Area

On the way to Yarraville, finding our way by taking turns that look right. Rest Area done; tomorrow Stone Tape Theory begins.

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Rest Area at Night Again, FOLA Arts House Naarm

Same truck; different position.

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Rest Area at Night, FOLA Arts House Naarm

“I want you to come in, to lie down – to hold me, just for a minute.”

S.J Norman — Rest Area, at FOLA, Arts House, Naarm Melbourne

The reason I’m in Australia for the first time in a decade, and in Naarm (Melbourne). Once again Rest Area, the first work I did with Onyx Carmine / S.J Norman. (Also Stone Tape Theory, which is next week and for another post.)

The truck of Rest Area will be parked out the back of Arts House at North Melbourne Town Hall for the first week of FOLA Festival of Live Art. Onyx and I will be Door Bitch-ing and in the bed from Wednesday until Sunday, joined by a pack totalling seven, including Virginia Barratt and Carly Sheppard (whom I last saw in Peckham, London at Take This, For It Is My Body).

I want you to come in, to lie down – to hold me, just for a minute.

Rest Area is the invocation and repetition of a familiar desire and a familiar gesture. In the back of a stationary truck, discover an unlikely bedchamber, where you’re invited into a stranger’s embrace.

In a moment of fleeting closeness, audience member and performer enact a fundamental human desire: to hold and be held in the arms of another.

A much-loved signature work originally performed by Norman themself, Rest Area enters its second decade of life re-scored for a cast of diverse bodies. Simple and profound, Rest Area is a one-to-one meditation on longing, comfort, and the melancholy eroticism of loneliness.

Arts House
North Melbourne Town Hall
521 Queensberry St,
North Melbourne

4–10pm, Wednesday 14 March
4–10pm, Thursday 15 March
4–10pm, Friday 16 March
4–10pm, Saturday 17 March
12–6pm, Sunday 18 March
Duration: One-on-one sessions for 15 mins
Tickets: $20 / $15

Isabelle Schad — Double Portrait, & Turning Solo, at HAU3

Two shows by and with friends this week: Isabelle Schad’s première at HAU of Turning Solo with the brilliant Naïma Ferré, and Double Portrait, both of which I saw in June showings in Isabelle’s studio in Wiesenburg.

Dear friends and colleagues,

We would like to invite you to the Berlin Premiere / world premiere of the new pieces Double Portrait and Turning Solo by Isabelle Schad at HAU Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin.

We would be very happy to see you.

  1. Berlin premiere / world premiere
    • Friday, 15.12.2017, 19:00, HAU Hebbel am Ufer Berlin (HAU3)
  2. more performance dates:
    • 16.12. 2017, 19:00
    • 17.12. 2017, 19:00
    • 18.12. 2017, 19:00

With Double Portrait and Turning Solo, Isabelle Schad continues a series of works which attempt to create distinct and personal portraits through a purely physical approach, moulding respective rhythms and energies into choreographed experiences.

Double Portrait — the portrait for Przemek Kaminski and Nir Vidan — seeks to form a solo for two persons with their bodies, movements and subjective rhythms. Each of them finds his prolongation in the other. In changing interdependencies a shared space defines self and other, intimacy and care, colliding forces and violence creating a web of connectivities. The work plays with aspects of Frances Bacon’s paintings, their complexity in visual rhythm, their intensity and immediacy.

Turning Solo — the portrait for Naïma Ferré — is based on her fascination with spinning for long periods. This whirling practice is brought into dialogue with Schad’s research around axial and weight shift, around inner movement material and its extension into the world, around energetic fields that characterise oneself and others. Little by little an initially minimalist study in movement becomes a shimmering jewel, a rotating sculpture, the choreographic portrait of a dancer.

Credits Double Portrait
concept and choreography: Isabelle Schad / co-choreography und performance: Przemek Kaminski, Nir Vidan / dramaturgical support: Saša Božić / sound: Damir Šimunović / lighting: Bruno Pocheron / stage: Isabelle Schad, Bruno Pocheron, Charlotte Pistorius, Thomas Henriksson (painting) / costumes: Charlotte Pistorius / head of production: Heiko Schramm / production defacto: Andrea Remetin

Credits Turning Solo
concept and choreography: Isabelle Schad / co-choreography und performance: Naïma Ferré / dramaturgical support: Saša Božić / sound: Damir Šimunović / lighting: Bruno Pocheron & Emese Csornai / costumes: Charlotte Pistorius / head of production: Heiko Schramm

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Ottensheim from Landgasthof Rodlhof

I found this photo, cleaning out my camera before yet another trip to Gemäldegalerie: the Danube is behind the line of trees.

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Linz Hbf, Waiting for the 🚞 Part of 🚌🚞🚌✈️🚌🚋

S.J wrote and talked with us about aftercare for Rest Area. Kali Rose said the snake I ran over on my e-bike was a good omen, and she’s never going to let that go. I arrive in Vienna, cafés I’d aimed for are closed for lunch so I find myself in Café Jelinek, a bit off Mariahilfestr. neighbourhoods I’ve biked through before. A second breakfast, after our all-’80s singing one in Landgasthaus Rodlhof on 3 hours sleep, raked from the work and hungover, is a big mug of coffee, croissant and honey, bowl of fruit and yoghourt, 4 slices bread with cream cheese, chives, tomatoes, all for 9,50 €. On the plane, easyJet to Schönefeld, they offer me two seats, ’cos I’m mad tall. I fall over myself into it. 4 hours later, a half before midnight and the Danube churning in my lungs, I arrive home. Katrin has left dinner on the table for me. Aftercare all the way.

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The Vans of Spotter Festival on Ottensheim Ferry

From the break during Friday night’s première, No. 4 van is S.J Norman’s Rest Area.