Gallery

Ars Electronica

Wednesday in Linz. I had to pick up some requirements for S.J Norman’s Rest Area and pick up Kali Rose from the train station, all the way from Amsterdam to be the person in the bed in the van of Rest Area. I had an hour to kill, and had planned Sunday for mediæval art (did not happen), so went to Ars Electronica.

I’m rethinking my museum-ing, or at least for the moment not taking hundreds of photos, editing and blogging scores. These are simply things I liked and felt motivated enough to photograph. There’s so much in the museum, and much of it is temporal, interactive, and 3-dimensional; photography doesn’t serve these well.

I sent “Your unreadable text message to +43 664 1788374” for Stefan Tiefengraber’s your unerasable text. My phone autocorrected. It was pushed to the shredder then sat there, unshredded. The pink of the Biolab was so, so, very hot, florescent, candy, neon pink, rendered as something less than all those and fuchsia by my camera. Markus Reibe’s Protected Areas 2 is the closest thing to recognisable, non-interactive, 2-dimensional art I saw, on a wall documenting the history of what was digital / new media / computer art, and what I just call art these days. The atrium of Ars Electronica was bus yellow and grey cement. If I had time, I would have spent hours here with hundreds of photos.

Video

Field Series 1

Me messing around with mediæval art, Photoshopping it until it’s far from the 3/4 of a millennium ago of its origin. It started as a visit to the Gemäldegalerie when I decided to do closeups of some of my favourite works. This is part of the Altarretabel in drei Abteilung mit dem Gnadenstuhl, from after 1250. Last night, feeling unexpectedly inspired around midnight, I realised I could mash another few score of layers into an image I was working on six months ago, and increase the density in ways that somehow appeal to my brain and eyes and emotions. I always zoom in on these images, like there’s myriad possible paintings in each. This time I took screenshots of those, and wanting to know what they might look like animated, threw them into Final Cut X and spat out 48 seconds of video.

I was asking myself if this is art. I know art and make art, but still. Maybe they’re sketches of possibilities. I like the artefacts generated from the process. I have no control over this. I have some control in which direction to push an image, but a lot of the detail is only minimally editable. Things happen, I make decisions, other things happen, possibilities open and close, I try and steer it towards a particular satisfaction, but each individual line and gradient and tone, no, that’s the software making its own decisions based on what I ask it to do. And as always, the further I get from using software as it was intended, the more interesting it becomes to me.

Quote

Our first manifesto we released by fax. We didn’t …

Our first manifesto we released by fax. We didn’t have problems spelling the word, ‘cunt’; I think it was the word ‘manifesto’ we had problems with.

VNX Matrix, Virginia Barratt & Francesca di Rimini, overheard in Wired interview in my lounge

You can create art & beauty on a computer

On the other side of the hemisphere in Berlin, the 22nd Chaos Communication Congress has hackers making the world a beautiful place through art, and artists making the world a beautiful place through hacking.

Art & Beauty is the central area (B01) at the ground floor of 22C3. It houses a list of interesting projects devoted to doing creative things with technology and is the central relaxation point of the Congress. You also find the catering facilities here along with good music day in day out. Furthermore you can buy congress shirts, pullover, jackets, poster and so on.

The VISUAL BERLIN association is responsible for sound and visuals at the 22c3 art & beauty area, in company with c-base.org, kulturtaikonauten.org and supported by the jfe.kleinmachnow. VISUAL BERLIN is a community of local video artists and VJs that gets involved with cooperative projects and mutual exchange with the local and international visualist scene and deals with the technological and cultural aspects of video art. In the course of organizing the 22c3 cultural program in the evenings, VISUAL BERLIN will present harmonic showcases of different audio- and video-artists – visual jam sessions during the day along with collaboration and communication. During the whole time there will be musical output from several DJs and Open Source Netlabels. Furthermore VISUAL BERLIN will organize the audiovisual program of the 22C3 Aftershowparty on the last day at the C-base.

If you want to participate or have any questions, please contact ST.

areas and activities:
AV-Node (visualberlin.org)
BlinkenArea
Gimp
Go Lounge
Holo-Arts
Mechatronics
— 22CCC

blinking the Alexanderplatz
blinking the Alexanderplatz
21C3 – Art & Beauty
21C3 – Art & Beauty